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Educational Theatre: Journals and Articles

This guide is intended as a starting place for researchers, pointing to tools for finding books, scholarly articles, reviews, and other topical and collection-related information in the area of Educational Theatre.

3 things to remember!

When using article databases, remember there are always three stages in your workflow (the "three Ds"):

1) Discovery: Do (and redo!) your searching, using varying terms and combining using the Boolean operators "and, or, not" to get good results. Your first search is not your best search, but rather an opportunity to learn how to immediately do a better search

2) Delivery: For items that you like, select the link to the fulltext if available, or click on the button to see if we own the item. If you want to keep this item, either save it to your own computer, email it to yourself, or print it.

3) Database it: Keep the "meta-information" about all that good resources you found for your records and to make your bibliographies. You will find yourself returning to resources so having a system in place will save you time and aggravation later. The NYU Libraries offer a number of tools to our users to help with this, in particular a tool called RefWorks, which you can learn about here.

Google Scholar

Google Scholar is a time-saving, scholarly search interface accessible from within the Google interface. With Google Scholar, you can access peer-reviewed journal articles, books and book sections. For literature searching, specialized databases have more functionality and access more comprehensive results, but Google Scholar is a good tool

Setting Alerts

See a complete list of databases

http://s3.amazonaws.com/libapps/accounts/40766/images/archpage.png

General Theatre Databases

Other Important Databases

Limiting to "Peer Reviewed" Articles

"Peer reviewed"  (or "refereed" journals) are those that subject content to a critical review by other experts in the field prior to accepting a manuscript for publication. Thus, limiting your literature search to the peer-reviewed journals ensures a higher level of scholarship and research methodology.  Magazines, trade journals, and newspapers tend to be "non-peer-reviewed," meaning perhaps just the editor or someone who is not an expert in the field has reviewed the content before publishing.  How do you know if a journal citation is from a peer-reviewed journal?

  • You can do a journal title search in Ulrich's Global Serials Directory.  The symbol:   indicates a journal is "refereed"
  • You can look for the "Limits" feature in many databases to narrow search results by publication type. 

Research in Drama Education

Teaching artist journal.

Youth theatre journal

Guidelines for writing a literature review