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unCOMMON @ the Research Commons: A Salon Series: Home

Processing Black Data: A Story About Civil Rights and Modern Computing

Processing Black Data: A Story About Civil Rights and Modern Computing

                       

Charlton McIlwain | New York University

Black people are either invisible in the annals of computing and Internet histories, or viewed as perpetual have-nots on the wrong side of the digital divide. This talk reconsiders Black people's relationship with the Internet and modern computing by situating it within the history of the civil rights movement - a history that doesn't merely parallel, but intersects with the development and evolution of computing.

Dr. Charlton McIlwain is the Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Diversity at NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication. His research focuses on the intersections of race and digital media, in the contexts of inequality and racial justice activism. He is currently working on the forthcoming book from Oxford University Press titled, “Black Software: The Internet and Racial Justice, From the AfroNet to Black Lives Matter.”

Wednesday, October 25 | 6:30 pm

Bobst Library | Room 745, 7th Floor, AFC

Open to the Public | Light Refreshments will be served

 

RSVP

The unCOMMON Salons are sponsored by the Bobst Library Reference Departments (Business & Government Documents, Coles Science Center, and Social Sciences & Humanities)

Gangster Dreams: How Chinatown Organized Crime Engineered the Chinese Restaurants Industry in the United States

Gangster Dreams: How Chinatown Organized Crime Engineered

the Chinese Restaurants Industry in the United States

                       

Heather Lee | New York University

Gangster Dreams reveals how New York's most powerful Chinese gang transformed Chinese restaurants from a marginal institution into a national, mass consumer business.  In the 1880s, members of the On Leong opened restaurants in Chinatown to entertain local powerbrokers who helped them dominate the underground economy. Their restaurants attracted bohemian men and women, whose enthusiasm in print and art made eating Chinese food a coveted urban activity. At the turn of the century, On Leong leaders expanded beyond Chinatown, running upscale restaurants that served hundreds nightly. In 1915, ringleaders leveraged popular appreciation of Chinese food to win exemptions to anti-Chinese immigration laws for restaurant owners. They parlayed these privileges into lucrative human smuggling operations, using their restaurants across the United States to secure visas for people in China. The On Leong weathered Prohibition and the Great Depression by profiting from and entrapping illegal immigrants in restaurant work.  

Heather Lee is an assistant professor of history at NYU Shanghai. She is completing a book on the history of Chinese restaurants in New York City and developing a database of historical Chinese restaurants in the United States. Her research has been featured in NPR, Atlantic magazine, and Gastropod, a podcast on food science and history. She has advised and curated exhibitions at the New York Historical Society, the National Museum of American History, and the Museum of Chinese in America. 

Wednesday, October 18 | 5:00 pm

Bobst Library | Room 745, 7th Floor, AFC

Open to the Public | Light Refreshments will be served

RSVP

 

The unCOMMON Salons are sponsored by the Bobst Library Reference Departments (Business & Government Documents, Coles Science Center, and Social Sciences & Humanities)

What is a Salon?

salon is a gathering of people under the roof of an inspiring host, held partly to amuse one another and partly to refine the taste and increase the knowledge of the participants through conversation. These gatherings often consciously followed Horace's definition of the aims of poetry, "either to please or to educate" ("aut delectare aut prodesse est"). Salons, commonly associated with French literary and philosophical movements of the 17th and 18th centuries, were carried on until quite recently in urban settings.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salon_(gathering)

Publication that premiered at a Salon!

Michelle Greenwald presented at an April 4, 2013 Salon entitled, "Optimizing and Inspiring Innovation to Create New Products and Services."  Catalyzing Innovation: 60 Lines of Thinking to Drive Innovation, her new book which grew out of her presentation, is now available at the iTunes Store.  In her own words, Michelle describes the book as, "different from anything written on innovation before.  It's an extremely visual tool (over 500 categorized examples), and it links to strategically building product and services.  Companies, entrepreneurs & designers can use the framework to innovate in a more methodical, complete & creative way.  Several international business schools have inquired about using it to teach innovation." 

Glad you were able to give us a preview Michelle!

History of Salons at NYU Libraries

NYU Libraries first started hosting salons in 2007.  The Coles Science Salons were a speaker series created and organized by the Coles Science Center, the science reference department at Bobst Library.  The early Salons had a Science focus and proved to be quite popular with the NYU community.  The Business and Government Documents Center, drawn by the success of the Science salons, also began hosting business focused salons in 2012.  Not to be left out, the Social Sciences & Humanities Reference were also planning to host their own salon series.  But, rather than all the reference centers hosting competing salons, it was decided to join forces to create the unCOMMON Salons.  These Salons are a reflection of the interdisciplinary research being conducted at NYU, and are now co-sponsored by Business and Government Documents, Coles Science Center, and the Social Sciences & Humanities Reference Center.  

The unCOMMON Salons are scheduled to be held 2-3 times per semester as a space for NYU scholars to share their work. The purpose of the salons is to foster interdisciplinary dialogue,  encourage networking across disciplines, and provide a vibrant place in the library for students, faculty, and library staff to informally socialize with each another.

If you would like to present at an unCOMMON Salon, please contact us:

Brynne Campbell - brynne.campbell@nyu.edu

Hadeer Elsabi - hadeer.elsbai@nyu.edu

Laurie Murphy - laurie.murphy@nyu.edu

Amy Valladares - amy.valladares@nyu.edu