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History of Medicine, Healthcare, and Disease

Guide to locating research on historical health topics and diseases.

Locating Sources @ Bobst

The library collections at NYU contain:Pigeon sitting on top of stone lion's head in front of the New York Public Library.

  • manuscripts and other archival materials,
  • correspondence and diaries,
  • photographs, films, artwork, music,
  • posters and prints,
  • government documents and data sets,
  • ephemera and artifacts,
  • serials and books,
  • maps and other resources

Visit the NYU Libraries website and the websites of the Special Collections for details on library holdings.

Search BobCat

To find cataloged materials at NYU and consortium libraries.

Search finding aids

To find processed archival collections.  You may search across collections or search each of the following library's archival finding aids individually.

Databases

Use the Databases by Subject page to find sources on your topic in online databases.

Image:  "Pigeon on New York Public Library" / By Ben Asen, 2001. New York Public Library.  Catalog No. MssArc RG10 592.  Digital ID: ps_ar_65.

Archival Sources Beyond NYU

See the Archives Beyond Bobst research guide for tips on finding materials in archival repositories around the world.

Using Archives & Manuscripts

Consult the Using Archives & Manuscripts research guide for additional information and assistance.

Link to Research Guide for Primary Sources

Primary Sources are:

  • Materials that contain direct evidence, first-hand testimony, or an eyewitness account concerning a topic or event under investigation
  • Sources that provide the raw data for your research
  • Examples:  In addition to diaries, correspondence, statistics, photographs, and the many other types of sources typically considered to be primary sources, you may add just anything to the list.  The way you interpret or use a source determines whether it is a primary source or not.

LINK to the NYU Libraries Research Guide to Finding and Using Primary Sources

Letter home from a Union nurse concerning her lodging and daily life

[Letter home from a Union nurse concerning her lodging and daily life.], n.d.

Civil War Treasures from the New-York Historical Society, [nhnycw/ak ak00028]
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpcoop/nhihtml/cwnyhshome.html