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NYU Reads

A selection of resources for engaging with the NYU Reads books.

Settler Colonialism

Children, language, lands: almost everything was stripped away, stolen when you weren't looking because you were trying to stay alive

- Braiding Sweetgrass, The Council of Pecans (p.17).

Journal and News Articles 

Side by side photos comparing three Sioux boys' images (in traditional Indigenous attire) as they entered Carlisle Indian Boarding School with a photo from three years later of the boys with short hair and clothing from the boarding school they were sent to.

Three Sioux boys as they entered the Carlisle Indian Boarding School in 1883 on the left and three years after on the right. From the Carlisle Indian School Resource Center

People of the Seventh Fire

Our elders say that we live in the time of the seventh fire. We are the ones the ancestors spoke of, the ones who will bend to the task of putting things back together to rekindle the flames of the sacred fire, to begin the rebirth of the nation.

-Braiding Sweetgrass, Shkitagen: People of the Seventh Fire (p.368).

News Articles

Books

Print Books

Ebooks

Organizations

Additional Resources

Land Acknowledgement

A Land Acknowledgement is a statement recognizing the Indigenous communities that have been displaced from their land upon which an institution was built on. It pays respects to Indigenous communities and opens up the space for tribal sovereignty. By placing a Land Acknowledgement statement in institutions, we are acknowledging that the space it was built was on stolen land and allows these very same institutions to educate and dismantle the legacy of settler colonialism.